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Shannon Deminick's blog all about web development

Configuring Azure Active Directory login with Umbraco Members

February 18, 2019 02:09
Configuring Azure Active Directory login with Umbraco Members

This post is about configuring Azure Active Directory with Umbraco Members (not Users), meaning this is for your front-end website, not the Umbraco back office. I did write up a post about Azure AD with back office users though, so if that is what you are looking for then this is the link.

Install the Nuget packages

First thing to do is get the UmbracoIdentity package installed.

PM > Install-Package UmbracoIdentity

(This will also install the UmbracoIdentity.Core base package)

This package installs some code snippets and updates your web.config to enable ASP.Net Identity for Umbraco members. Umbraco ships with the old and deprecated ASP.Net Membership Providers for members and not ASP.Net Identity so this package extends the Umbraco CMS and the Umbraco members implementation to use ASP.Net Identity APIs to interact with the built in members data store. Installing this package will remove the (deprecated) FormsAuthentication module from your web.config and it will no longer be used to authenticate members, so the typical members snippets built into Umbraco macros will not work. Instead use the supplied snippets shipped with this package.

To read more about this package see the GitHub repo here.

Next, the OpenIdConnect package needs to be installed

PM > Install-Package Microsoft.Owin.Security.OpenIdConnect

Configure Azure Active Directory

Head over to the Azure Active Directory section on the Azure portal, choose App Registrations (I’m using the Preview functionality for this) and create a New registration

image

Next fill out the app details

image

You may also need to enter other redirect URLs depending on how many different environments you have. All of these URLs can be added in the Authentication section of your app in the Azure portal.

For AAD configuration for front-end members, the redirect Urls are just your website’s root URL and it is advised to keep the trailing slash.

Next you will need to enable Id Tokens

image

Configure OpenIdConnect

The UmbracoIdentity package will have installed an OWIN startup class in ~/App_Start/UmbracoIdentityStartup.cs (or it could be in App_Code if you are using a website project). This is how ASP.Net Identity is configured for front-end members and where you can specify the configuration for different OAuth providers. There’s a few things you’ll need to do:

Allow external sign in cookies

If you scroll down to the ConfigureMiddleware method, there will be a link of code to uncomment: app.UseExternalSignInCookie(DefaultAuthenticationTypes.ExternalCookie); this is required for any OAuth providers to work.

Enable OpenIdConnect OAuth for AAD

You’ll need to add this extension method class to your code which is some boiler plate code to configure OpenIdConnect with AAD:

public static class UmbracoADAuthExtensions
{
    public static void ConfigureAzureActiveDirectoryAuth(this IAppBuilder app,
        string tenant, string clientId, string postLoginRedirectUri, Guid issuerId,
        string caption = "Active Directory")
    {
        var authority = string.Format(
            System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
            "https://login.windows.net/{0}",
            tenant);

        var adOptions = new OpenIdConnectAuthenticationOptions
        {
            ClientId = clientId,
            Authority = authority,
            RedirectUri = postLoginRedirectUri
        };

        adOptions.Caption = caption;
        //Need to set the auth type as the issuer path
        adOptions.AuthenticationType = string.Format(
            System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
            "https://sts.windows.net/{0}/",
            issuerId);
        app.UseOpenIdConnectAuthentication(adOptions);
    }
}

Next you’ll need to call this code, add the following line underneath the app.UseExternalSignInCookie method call:

app.ConfigureAzureActiveDirectoryAuth(
    ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["azureAd:tenantId"],
    ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["azureAd:clientId"],
    //The value of this will need to change depending on your current environment
    postLoginRedirectUri: ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["azureAd:redirectUrl"],
    //This is the same as the TenantId
    issuerId: new Guid(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["azureAd:tenantId"]));

Then you’ll need to add a few appSettings to your web.config (based on your AAD info):

<add key="azureAd:tenantId" value="YOUR-TENANT-ID-GUID" />
<add key="azureAd:clientId" value="YOUR-CLIENT-ID-GUID" />
<add key="azureAd:redirectUrl" value="http://my-test-website/" />

Configure your Umbraco data

The UmbracoIdentity repository has the installation documentation and you must follow these 2 instructions, and they are very simple:

  1. You need to update your member type with the securityStamp property
  2. Create the Account document type

Once that is done you will have an Member account management page which is based off of the installed views and snippets of the UmbracoIdentity package. This account page will look like this:

image

As you can see the button text under the “Use another service to log in” is the login provider name which is a bit ugly. The good news is that this is easy to change since this is just a partial view that was installed with the UmbracoIdentity package. You can edit the file: ~/Views/UmbracoIdentityAccount/ExternalLoginsList.cshtml, the code to render that button text is using @p.Authentication provider but we can easily change this to @p.Caption which is actually the same caption text used in the extension method we created. So the whole button code can look like this instead:


<button type="submit" class="btn btn-default"
        id="@p.AuthenticationType"
        name="provider"
        value="@p.AuthenticationType"
        title="Log in using your @p.Caption account">
    @p.Caption
</button>

This is a bit nicer, now the button looks like:

image

The purpose of all of these snippets and views installed with UmbracoIdentity is for you to customize how the whole flow looks and works so you’ll most likely end up customizing a number of views found in this folder to suit your needs.

That’s it!

Once that’s all configured, if you click on the Active Directory button to log in as a member, you’ll be brought to the standard AAD permission screen:

image

Once you accept you’ll be redirect back to your Account page:

image

Any customizations is then up to you. You can modify how the flow works, whether or not you accepting auto-linking accounts (like in the above example), or if you require a member to exist locally before being able to link an OAuth account, etc… All of the views and controller code in UmbracoIdentity is there for you to manipulate. The main files are:

  • ~/Views/Account.cshtml
  • ~/Views/UmbracoIdentityAccount/*
  • ~/Controllers/UmbracoIdentityAccountController.cs
  • ~/App_Start/UmbracoIdentityStartup.cs


Happy coding!

Deploying to Azure from VSTS using publish profiles and msdeploy

October 26, 2017 06:39
Deploying to Azure from VSTS using publish profiles and msdeploy

In almost all of the examples online about how to deploy various services to Azure, they always list the super easy way to do it and that is to authenticate your current account to your Azure subscription which then grants your VSTS build to do all sorts of things… The problem is that not everyone has the security clearance to use the super easy tools in VSTS.

When you attempt to use these nice tools in VSTS you might get an error like this: “Failed to set Azure permission ‘RoleAssignmentId: some-guid-goes-here’ for the service principal … does not have authorizationto perform action ‘Microsoft.Authorization/roleAssignments/write’ over scope” This is because these nice VSTS tools actually creates a custom user behind the scenes in your azure subscription to use but your account doesn’t have access to authorize that.

Luckily there’s a work around

MS Deploy … sigh

Maybe there are other work arounds but this works, however it’s not the most elegant. I thought I’d post my findings here because it was a bit of a pain in the ass to get this all correct.

So here’s the steps:

1. Download the publish profile

You need to get the publish profile from your app service that you want to deploy to. This can be a website, a staging slot, an Azure function, (probably a bunch of others)

image

The file downloaded is an XML file containing a bunch of info you’ll need

2. Create a release definition and environment for your deployment

This assumes that you are pretty familiar with VSTS

You’ll want to create an empty environment in your release definition. Normally this is where you could choose the built in fancy VSTS deployment templates like “Azure App Service Deployment” … but as above, this doesn’t work if you don’t have security clearance. Instead, choose ‘Empty’

image

Then in your environment tasks, add Batch Script

image

3. Setup your batch script

There’s 2 ways to go about this and both depend on a msdeploy build output. This build output is generated by your build in VSTS if you are using a standard VSTS Visual Studio solution build. This will create msdeploy packages for you and will have put them in your artifacts folder. Along with msdeploy packages this will also generate a cmd batch file that executes msdeploy and a readme file to tell you how to execute it which contains some important info that you should read.

So here’s 2 options: Execute the cmd file, or execute msdeploy.exe directly

Execute the cmd file

There’s a bit of documentation about this online but most of it is based on using the SetParameters.xml file to adjust settings… but i just don’t want to use that.

Here’s the Path and Arguments that you need to run:

$(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/YOUR_BUILD_NAME/drop/YOUR_MSBUILD_PACKAGE.deploy.cmd
/y "/m:https://${publishUrl}/MSDeploy.axd?site=${msdeploySite}" /u:$(userName) /p:$(userPWD) /a:Basic -enableRule:DoNotDeleteRule "-setParam:name='IIS Web Application Name',value='${msdeploySite}'"

The parameters should be added to your VSTS Variables: ${msdeploySite}, $(userName), $(userPWD) and these variables correspond exactly to what is in your publish profile XML file that you downloaded. These parameters need to be pretty much exact, any misplaced quote or if you don’t include https, etc… will cause this to fail.

Important: the use of -enableRule:DoNotDeleteRule is totally optional, if you want to reset your site to exactly what is in the msdeploy package you do not want this. If however, you have user generated images, content or custom config files that exist on your site and you don’t want them deleted when you deploy, then you need to set this.

I’m unsure if this will work for Azure Functions deployment (it might!) … but I used the next option to do that:

Execute msdeploy.exe directly

If you execute the CMD file, you’ll see in the VSTS logs the exact msdeploy signature used which is:

"C:\Program Files\IIS\Microsoft Web Deploy V3\msdeploy.exe" -source:package='d:\a\r1\a\YOUR_PROJECT_NAME\drop\YOUR_MSDEPLOY_PACKAGE_FILE.zip' -dest:auto,computerName="https://YOUR_PUBLISH_URL/MSDeploy.axd?site=YOUR_PROFILE_NAME",userName=********,password=********,authtype="Basic",includeAcls="False" -verb:sync -disableLink:AppPoolExtension -disableLink:ContentExtension -disableLink:CertificateExtension -setParamFile:"d:\a\r1\a\YOUR_PROJECT_NAME\drop\YOUR_MSDEPLOY_PACKAGE_FILE.SetParameters.xml" -enableRule:DoNotDeleteRule -setParam:name='IIS Web Application Name',value='YOUR_PROFILE_NAME'

So if you wanted, you could take this and execute that directly instead of the CMD file. I use this method to deploy Azure Functions but the script is a little simpler since that deployment doesn’t require all of these parameters. For that I use this for the Path and Arguments:

C:\Program Files\IIS\Microsoft Web Deploy V3\msdeploy.exe
-verb:sync -source:package='$(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/YOUR_BUILD_NAME/drop/YOUR_MSDEPLOY_PACKAGE.zip' -dest:auto,computerName="https://$(publishUrl)/msdeploy.axd?site=$(msdeploySite)",UserName='$(userName)',Password='$(userPWD)',AuthType='Basic' -setParam:name='IIS Web Application Name',value='$(msdeploySite)'


Hopefully this comes in handy for someone Winking smile